March 20, 2024

Episode 19 Transcript | Sindee Savage of V School & Neon Rodeo

Sindee Savage fro V School joins Host Peter Stevenson and Co-Host Alysha Smith from modern8 to talk about creating amazing online and in person events, what makes her an optimist and why you should order the cheeseburger from a pizza joint. 

PETER STEVENSON

Welcome to by subject. I’m your host, Peter Stevenson. I’m here with my co host, Alicia Smith, creative and managing director of agency and Moderna. And our guest today is Cindy Savage, director of community at V school and CoO at Neon Rodeo. Welcome.

SINDEE SAVAGE

Hey, thanks, you guys. What a pleasure.

PETER STEVENSON

I know, I’m so excited. First off, you’re like my favorite person to see at our co working studio.

SINDEE SAVAGE

Oh, my God.

PETER STEVENSON

Every time I see you, I get a chance to come over and give you a hug. And you have the best energy.

ALYSHA SMITH

Totally.

PETER STEVENSON

Anyone gets a chance to see hang.

ALYSHA SMITH

Out with you and a badass name.

PETER STEVENSON

I’d love for people to kind of get to know your story, your background, where you grew up, what got you into the role that you’re doing now, that director of community role. Tell us a little bit about where you grew up and where you went to high school, what you went to college for, when you do, when you became a big kid.

SINDEE SAVAGE

All right, so all of the good things about my life and where I’m at right now. Okay. I was adopted when I was four months old from Seoul, Korea. And so I was adopted into a fantastic family here locally in South Jordan, Utah. So I’ve grown up here, traveled a lot, tried, know, just experience life outside of the Utah bubble. And I went to school here. I went to the University of Utah, graduated in broadcast journalism.

PETER STEVENSON

What made you want to do broadcast journalism?

SINDEE SAVAGE

Oh, my gosh, you guys remember MTV back in the day when they’d actually play music videos? I wanted to be an aspiring VJ.

PETER STEVENSON

You did?

SINDEE SAVAGE

I wanted to move to New York and I wanted to be a VJ on MTV.

PETER STEVENSON

Did you get any opportunity to do that?

ALYSHA SMITH

Oh, you first did that at all?

SINDEE SAVAGE

No, I mean, I did the broadcast journalism thing and went through the program, and shortly after graduation, I had my daughter. And so back then, I’m not sure what it’s like now, but moving to a remote, smaller city to get your start as a reporter was kind of just what you did. Unless you had a solid internship here, which I didn’t. And at that time, I just wasn’t able to just pick up and move, and all my support was here. So, no, I did not continue on. I wasn’t a VJ.

PETER STEVENSON

That’s so tragic. You didn’t go on real world. You didn’t do any of the MTV stuff.

SINDEE SAVAGE

I mean, I still could maybe.

PETER STEVENSON

Yeah.

ALYSHA SMITH

Or channel one.

SINDEE SAVAGE

Sure. Yes. There you go.

PETER STEVENSON

Channel one with Lisa Ling. Yeah. Okay. All right, so you got into broadcast journalism, and so you graduated with a broadcast journalist degree. But you weren’t going to go do that. You had a child. Did you enter the workforce right away?

SINDEE SAVAGE

I did, yeah. Right after graduation, I landed a job at Arup Laboratories up in research park and I started out in project management and then moved my way into the marketing department. I was at Arup for about ten years. Big chunk of.

ALYSHA SMITH

Yeah.

PETER STEVENSON

And so what were you doing for the marketing? You went from project management to marketing. What were you doing over there?

SINDEE SAVAGE

Oh my gosh. I wore a lot of hats there. It was so much fun. I think that’s the place where I got the experience and exposure of what marketing is. I’m not a true marketer in the sense, but I do love to tell stories and I love either verbally or through pictures or just anything of explaining things and showcasing stuff. So I was able to move up into their marketing department. So I helped implement their internal communications. At the time, digital signage was huge and so they had so many different remote locations, different hospitals, so I helped implement that. And then internal communications PR, I did tours of the laboratories. I don’t know if you guys are familiar with Arup at all.

PETER STEVENSON

I actually know very little about them. I was curious what kind of marketing they were doing externally, but probably mostly I’m not their target audience, so that’s why I know nothing about them.

SINDEE SAVAGE

Yeah. Which makes sense. When I first started there, they have the business side, but they have the laboratory side. And it’s interesting because some of the lab folks didn’t realize there was a business side. Some of the business side didn’t realize there’s a lab, but anything that comes out of your body and needs to be tested, you can ship it off to Arup or another place like Arup, where they do all of the testing. So there’s a huge market with pathologists and just the medical field. The medical, yeah, they’re a big operation.

PETER STEVENSON

And so what made you think, I’m going to move from project management? I want to go over to marketing. What made you interested in that role?

SINDEE SAVAGE

I think I had the exposure of working on different projects within the company, in different departments and being able to see the needs of certain things because project management was, it wasn’t new, but it was new. They were expanding and they had a team of three. Two or three. But I was able to have exposure in different medical departments or fields and in the projects it would touch marketing. So if there was a trade show or if they needed marketing material or communicating internally what all of the departments do for each other. And so I just started to lean more into the marketing roles through project management by having exposure to the marketing team.

ALYSHA SMITH

I mean, journalism and marketing, they’re related a bit. So do you think that going into the role of account manager, do you think that maybe you could have seen yourself, is that something that you wanted to kind of get to eventually? Was marketing or was that kind of just a surprise?

SINDEE SAVAGE

I think it was a surprise, but it felt natural to me. So with broadcast journalism, telling a story, putting videos together, editing, meeting people, creating relationships is just a natural thing for myself and in projects, and being able to chat with decision makers and executive teams and team members and relating, putting it all together. I’ve also realized through my career and multiple careers, like what my strengths are, and that’s really one on one connections, and someone can give me an idea or a project and I know how to streamline it. I know who needs to be involved. I can cut out all of the scrap that doesn’t need to be there to make it efficient, quicker, better. And so for me, project management and marketing and communication, journalism stuff, all that, it’s all one package. In my mind, I believe the same.

ALYSHA SMITH

I mean, I graduated in communications and now I’m in the marketing world. And so to me, they really are very related. Overlap a lot.

SINDEE SAVAGE

I agree. Yeah.

PETER STEVENSON

So you are there. What kind of things were you doing? You were there for how long?

SINDEE SAVAGE

Ten years. Ten years.

PETER STEVENSON

So what did your role grow into there?

SINDEE SAVAGE

At the end of the day, it really grew into trade shows and events. And so putting on multiple, multiple trade shows throughout the year, down to all the logistics, the planning, the messaging, working with the graphics team on what the booth looks like, building out the booth, working with vendors, like every single detail that had to make the show happen.

PETER STEVENSON

Did you love it?

SINDEE SAVAGE

Yes.

PETER STEVENSON

What about going to events and being part of that community in trade shows? What did you love about it?

SINDEE SAVAGE

Just that every day is different.

PETER STEVENSON

Okay.

SINDEE SAVAGE

You do have a main goal. I love working with a deadline because then it forces you to get to the finish line, and then there’s a sense of accomplishment afterwards. Pulling off a 20 x 20 or a 40 x 40 footprint and watching that build and knowing all of the pieces that you had part of in that is really cool. And then just cold collaboration. Different departments overlap with functions and just, I don’t know, meeting people and creating relationships not only for the event, but then continuing on.

PETER STEVENSON

Did you have early champions as you moved from project management of marketing, who helped guide you in that career and helped you become the marketer? The event planner that you were?

SINDEE SAVAGE

Yeah, I think so. For sure. Looking back at all of the places that I’ve worked, I can pick out people who see your talents and they see you and then they help you get to where you want to go or they’re your advocate where you may not even know that they recognize or see who you are. So I was fortunate to have a couple of people in the marketing team, specifically when I was at Arup. See like, oh my gosh, she’s got a knack for that or she’s really good at that. She would be a great asset to our marketing team.

PETER STEVENSON

Were they finding things that you didn’t know about yourself? Were they able to identify skills and traits that you didn’t know you had because they were outside you and then they helped to flourish them?

SINDEE SAVAGE

Yes. And then also flipping that where I know I have certain abilities that could actually enhance their project, their department, their team.

PETER STEVENSON

And sharing that and sharing it. Interesting. Yeah, it’s not a question that I’ve asked a lot of other people. What was working as a young mother like in that time? Know, were they really flexible? Were they easy to work with as a company?

SINDEE SAVAGE

Oh my gosh. Yes. Arup was one of the first companies to bring on site daycare.

PETER STEVENSON

Oh my gosh.

SINDEE SAVAGE

They built that out while I was there and I took full advantage of it. And so by that time, Kendall was preschool age, so she could come to work with me every day until kindergarten. And so it was right there on site. It was fantastic.

PETER STEVENSON

That’s amazing. And it’s probably so beneficial to have an employer who recognizes the value of that for you and got so many more years from you, probably from that loyalty that you have, right?

SINDEE SAVAGE

Yeah.

PETER STEVENSON

Okay, so you left Arup and you were in this marketing track. Where’d you go next?

SINDEE SAVAGE

Yeah, so I kind of outgrew my position there. So I also stayed in healthcare after that for another couple of years and I moved over to CHG Healthcare. So I entered in, in their marketing department and their brand team and worked with the allied team. So that’s Pas and nurse practitioners, NPs, just different titles within healthcare. Shortly after that, I was brought onto their event team or their trade shows. So that’s really a strong background that I have.

ALYSHA SMITH

Did you feel a strong passion for healthcare or was it just kind of the next step? You knew it. Was there a point where you thought, I want to move on from that? Or was it kind of like, oh, I think I want to do this for the rest of my career?

SINDEE SAVAGE

I think it was what I knew, because being at Arup for ten years and then looking for something else. CHG was different, but it was still under the umbrella of healthcare, so I was familiar with it. And going into the interview and being able to talk the same and understand just kind of how it works, I think was helpful. I didn’t necessarily want to be or stay in healthcare. That’s just how the stars aligned. Okay.

PETER STEVENSON

What do you think made you thinking about those traits that some of your advisors saw? What do you think made you such a good trade show or event marketer in those early years? And as you grew in that role, what made you and skills did you bring to the table that helped make you so successful?

SINDEE SAVAGE

That’s a good question. I think you could say detail oriented and super organized and all of that, but relationships and being able to communicate with several different types of industries, several different types of levels of decision makers or peers, and being able to get the point across, really, I don’t know. That is helpful. I’m able to do that, kind of put myself in any scenario and feel comfortable, and hopefully people are feeling the same and comfortable back. And so it’s equal exchange.

PETER STEVENSON

That warmness that you bring to every conversation that we talked about at the start of this is probably part of that, right?

SINDEE SAVAGE

I think so, yeah.

ALYSHA SMITH

Did you have any big learnings while you were kind of going through this, this trade show? Specialization or expertise?

SINDEE SAVAGE

Yeah, not specifically to the trade, but I think just in life and creating balance with personal and work and personal growth. Like, looking back at it in that part of my life, it’s like, we’re just getting through the day. I still feel like that now. We’re just getting through the day. But I’m more mindful now in the present from back then. You don’t know what you don’t know, but I think just. I don’t know. Being a hard worker, I don’t know if that’s still a thing anymore. I’m sorry, young folks. I’m really sorry. But just, yeah, being thorough and hard and dedicated and mean, I know that that’s out there. I know people are that way, but you know what mean. Yeah.

PETER STEVENSON

So, okay, so you’re there at CHG, and what’s the next role for you?

SINDEE SAVAGE

So after CHG, I went to large scale events. So international events at a company called no longer. They were bought out, but that was a really cool job where I literally got to travel around the world. I had a portfolio of clients, and I would execute all of the events, major events that they had throughout the year. So I was able to travel everywhere.

ALYSHA SMITH

Which was amazing and maybe hard.

PETER STEVENSON

Yeah. Did you bring your child with you? How did that work?

SINDEE SAVAGE

No, that was tough. She was in high school, middle school, high school at that point. So she was.

PETER STEVENSON

She didn’t want to spend time with you anyway.

SINDEE SAVAGE

I don’t know. I’m a pretty cool mom.

PETER STEVENSON

You are cool.

SINDEE SAVAGE

She would probably want to come out. She actually requested to come, but it was just hard. You’re working 18 hours, days like you are just literally on all the time. So to bring a child or family is hard unless you stay behind and make a vacation out of it.

PETER STEVENSON

So tell me about what you were doing for these events across the world.

ALYSHA SMITH

Yeah, maybe. Tell us about one of them specifically. Is there one that stands out?

SINDEE SAVAGE

Yeah, one of my clients. Man, there were so many different. Are you guys familiar with. Oh, goodness, I just spaced their name. They’re an MLM, but they had shows in Vegas and all these places, but it was like skincare. Okay, so to produce that and to go, so I was in charge of all of the registration and all of the attendees and all of the sessions and lead retrievals and gathering everything. So full spectrum. But that show in particular was just insane.

PETER STEVENSON

In Vegas?

SINDEE SAVAGE

In Vegas or this particular company, MLM skincare.

PETER STEVENSON

So how many people were. Why? Why was it insane?

SINDEE SAVAGE

So they have conferences each year. It would be similar to like a young living or something like that, where they have the annual conference, and they’re launching all of their new products and courses and classes and the distribution, but all the women that come to the event. So that show is probably 120,000 person show. So I’m in charge of all of registration and everything. It’s just a spectacle. I’ve never seen women act the way that they act at these shows because they’re releasing new products. They have lines out the door. It’s insane.

PETER STEVENSON

What made you successful at that job? How did you get through 120,000 people in registration? How did you accomplish that? In a somewhat not rowdy way, having.

SINDEE SAVAGE

A really solid team, having people that just understand their lanes of what you need to do, because there’s so many different places and things that you have to be in charge of. So a solid team having a great, great plan beforehand, so many meetings, just really dialing in how it’s going to work in the flow.

PETER STEVENSON

Yeah. Okay, interesting.

ALYSHA SMITH

Can you plan for all the contingencies?

SINDEE SAVAGE

No, but you try. Yeah, I think one show, we probably had everything go wrong. Like the Internet went down, like power went out registration goodness booths were just not working, and it’s like the first day of the show.

PETER STEVENSON

Yeah.

SINDEE SAVAGE

So being able to think on your feet, to know who to contact and just keep calm. You have to keep calm.

PETER STEVENSON

Amazing.

SINDEE SAVAGE

And you’re dying inside, and you’re just like, please, let’s just go home. But you can’t. No.

PETER STEVENSON

Okay. So you jump from doing these events, and at some point you find yourself at Kiln. Yes. Direct your community there. So tell me about why Kiln? What intrigued you about that idea of going to a co working space and doing not an event role?

SINDEE SAVAGE

Yes. So COVID happened. So I was at a show, and literally in Atlanta, Georgia, at a pet show where they bring all the pets in, and it’s called pet Zoo. Anyway, they shut the show down early. The governor had come across and said, hey, COVID is rampant. So I was out of work for a little bit and came across Kiln and reached out. I think actually, one of my friends worked there. She was a member, and the staff had said, hey, we’re looking for someone to help with programming, if you know anybody. So it was a referral, and I called them up, chatted with their team, and kind of went through the whole hiring process and was hired on probably the beginning of 2021.

PETER STEVENSON

Okay.

SINDEE SAVAGE

To run their programs and events. So I was over all of the kilns. So at that time, there was five locations.

PETER STEVENSON

There were five, yeah.

SINDEE SAVAGE

So two lehighs, Salt Lake. We were just finishing or starting Park City.

PETER STEVENSON

Okay.

SINDEE SAVAGE

Wrapping up Boulder, Colorado. And so my plan was to just help all of the member experience, making sure that it’s all under the same brand in each of the locations. And then that just kind of flourished into larger events. So creating founders and funders up in Eden, I helped start that, which was amazing.

PETER STEVENSON

What was the impetus of starting that? I know that’s become a pretty popular event. We had someone on here a couple of weeks ago who started the Utah beer festival. So it was fun to talk about that. I’d love to hear a little bit from you about what was the impetus to start. Know, what were some of the challenges of starting?

SINDEE SAVAGE

That was. It’s arian, our CEO. It was his idea to create space for founders specifically, and funders for them to have a gathering and to share ideas, to bring all the like minds together, talk about what’s happening, what the future is, all of the things. And with him and his network, we were able to secure in the Eden location, which is absolutely beautiful. And I think they’ve been doing it for four or five maybe.

PETER STEVENSON

Yeah, years.

SINDEE SAVAGE

It’s an annual thing, but curating that with the guests and then the topics and who’s going to be there and the messaging, and it was really fun.

ALYSHA SMITH

So did that launch during COVID then?

SINDEE SAVAGE

No, it was after.

ALYSHA SMITH

Okay, yeah, see, that sounds difficult.

PETER STEVENSON

What were some of the challenges from that first year to the second year that you learned from the first year that made the second year better?

SINDEE SAVAGE

I think since it was the first time ever doing that, you’re always going to run into lots of learnings, lots of lessons learned. You can go in with a game plan and an expectation. I think I’m trying to remember back in the day, what were some of the challenges? It was hard because we wanted to keep it small and intimate, but everybody wanted to be a part of it.

PETER STEVENSON

Right.

SINDEE SAVAGE

And so how do you say, you can’t say no, but you have to say no, right. And I know that that’s probably something, a challenge continuing on to today, because it’s something that they want to just keep intimate small, but they have created something really neat and special, so people want to be a part of it. Coming up with new and really exciting and unique experiences for the guests and for the attendees. Utah is amazing, but it’s its own bubble in the sense of bringing in new ideas and having the fear. Is someone going to like that, or is this too off cuff, or is this know in the vein of what we’re trying to do? So being creative in launching activations or events or activities during an event, it’s fun, but it’s challenging at the same time.

ALYSHA SMITH

Second guessing yourself, I bet. A lot. Yeah.

PETER STEVENSON

So at some point, V school reaches out. What was the reason that they approached you? What was the reason you jumped over to v school?

SINDEE SAVAGE

It all happened at the founder funder event.

PETER STEVENSON

Oh, really?

SINDEE SAVAGE

It comes full circle. It’s pretty crazy, but amazing. We had invited v school to attend, and mo reader, he and I actually went to high school together, and so we have a long history and friendship, but we had grown up and he and his family had moved away, and he had a job. He came back, and I didn’t realize that he worked at v school, CoO and I hadn’t heard of it before, but they were on the list, and so they had showed up, and it was just this awesome reunion with Mo, and he’s like, you did this, you produced this. And I’m like, yeah, it’s what I do. And it’s like, okay, so I think that sparked some interest, and he saw going back, know, you had asked, when people see things about you and you don’t realize, that was exactly what had happened with mo and myself. He saw me be able to do x, y, and z, and at that time, v school needed that, and they see a vision for that and to build more and more in that aspect. And so, yeah, he and Zaro reached out and said, hey, here’s an opportunity. They told me all about vschool. I immediately just fell in love with their mission. Truly. It’s such a cool place.

PETER STEVENSON

Maybe talk a little bit about vschool. What is that mission? What is V school doing? I think lots of people do know, but probably don’t know as well as they should.

SINDEE SAVAGE

Yeah, sure. Thanks. Little plugs here and there. For all places I’ve been. Vschool. We are a vocational, mastery based school. So that means you sign up for one of our programs, and it’s mastery based. And so depending on how quickly you learn and get the concept, you move on to the next level. The next level. So we teach three programs. We have web development, user design experience, and then we just recently brought on cybersecurity. So all of our courses are online. And before COVID they actually had a space downtown. They had housing. They had. And so people from across the US would apply, and they’d come out here and plow through the program and then be able to land a job with a really great company and truly go change the lives of their. So that’s knowing that, and that’s what they do in their mission. They invited me to a rooftop party. I think they called it campfire at the time. And so it was during my scoping out and figuring out what I want to do phase, and so I went up, and it was incredible. It was such a cool vibe, such great energy. I was able to meet current students, alumni, people who are advisors to them, and they had, I think, don day. So Riley was there on the panel, and I’ve known Riley, and so it was really good to see her and their partnership. And then they ended with this presentation. I always cry when I talk about this. A single mom who is a veteran, they presented her and her son with a life size check for full rights scholarship to b school. So for me to witness that and to know that’s what I would be doing every day. Sign me up. Sign me up. That’s so cool.

PETER STEVENSON

V school now is known as a place that throws great parties and events. They clearly were doing something right before you showed up. But why? They are a smaller organization. What about your skill set was going to make their world better. How are you going to help them sell more? How are you going to help them grow the V school brand?

SINDEE SAVAGE

That’s a good question. I don’t know how to answer that, really, but I think mo and I have this really amazing work relationship where he has these fantastic ideas. I can help enhance those ideas. And then we execute. And v school is really large and really big in community and creating space with music and art and tech and bringing it all in one spot. They’re really just fantastic about doing that.

PETER STEVENSON

Whose idea was it to bring the snakes to that bar?

SINDEE SAVAGE

Oh, so for Utah tech week, yeah, the opening party, mo, that legit was like 3 hours before it happened. We’re like, we need something to spice that up.

PETER STEVENSON

You walked in and I was like, okay, this is a party.

SINDEE SAVAGE

That was fun. That was a fun cherry on top.

PETER STEVENSON

I’d love to hear about the launch of Neon rodeo and what that project is and how V school and you were involved in that and what sort of the future of neon rodeo is.

SINDEE SAVAGE

Oh, my gosh. I love this passion project. It is so awesome. So through V school, 2024 will be the fourth year since my involvement there was one year previous to that. It started with the University of Utah. Well, actually, let me back up. It is a white paper. So our partner, Grant Barth created a white paper with intel, and they said, hey, go prove that out. And so Grant contacted the University of Utah multiple disciplinary design program, the Tongue Twister. And that senior class had a theme house. And so I believe it was 2021. Right after COVID, those students partnered up with Fice and they brought in Jesse Walker and they created a house party which just blew up. But they utilized all of the aspects of that white paper to be a success. And so the next year, they’re know, let’s get some other people involved. Like, let’s reach out to the community. And they really wanted someone in education and tech. And so they’re like, hey, let’s call up V school. So Mo said, hey, we’re going to kiln for a party. I’m like, what? Okay, whatever. Let’s go. We get there, there’s no party. But it was a misunderstanding of what the meeting was because it was Jesse Walker. All of these know people that we don’t know. So we’re like, yeah, what’s going on? Come to find out. It’s like the opening meeting for neon rodeo. At that time, it was neon desert and just a planning meeting to getting minds together. They shared the concept and asked V school to be the education arm, which that means bringing on speakers and panels and curating an education part off of the music the house. Each year, we work with a sister city. We brought in DJs from those cities to highlight them and then also pair like, what am I trying to say? Bringing out people in Salt Lake artists and creatives as well. So creating a space for them to come experience certain things and listen to the. So the year that Mo and I came on, we did it at UMoca. We had fantastic panels. We brought in so many cool people. The community’s response was just, like, ecstatic. And it’s just been growing and growing, and so we are just trying to carve out our path.

PETER STEVENSON

And so what is the mission of neon Rodeo?

SINDEE SAVAGE

Man, that’s such a good question. The mission of neon Rodeo is to create creative space, but also to give opportunity to those who aren’t in reach of. So, for example, the know, we’re bringing in instructors from art institutes from San Francisco. We’re bringing in artists from this place. We’re touching and bringing in people from Salt Lake and putting them in a room where our attendees and our friends can come listen and learn and have an opportunity to carry on that conversation afterwards. Where other festivals, south by Southwest has the education arm and all that, but ours is a smaller scale. It’s more intimate and just let opportunities happen as they come, but we want to present those opportunities to the community.

PETER STEVENSON

Yeah, that’s interesting.

SINDEE SAVAGE

Yeah.

PETER STEVENSON

Where do you see the future of events going? We talked a little bit earlier on before we started recording about an offline and online type of event. Where do you see events going in this new world of online, offline type of milieu?

SINDEE SAVAGE

I think events are. Everyone wants to have something to go to or something to look forward to. And I think we’re still in that phase of people coming out from the pandemic and really realizing the lack of that personal connection and being in a room with people. I still have people say, well, this is maybe the second or third event that I’ve come to, because they just haven’t been out. But I think events are just so important. It’s community building. It’s maintaining relationships. It’s creating space for people to just come be whatever industry you’re in.

PETER STEVENSON

Yeah.

ALYSHA SMITH

And how does that come kind of full circle to marketing? How do you see them as connected or related or why? Events for V school, I’m sure they do other forms of marketing, too.

SINDEE SAVAGE

Yeah, we do.

PETER STEVENSON

I get your great emails.

SINDEE SAVAGE

Thank you. Thank you. I’ll let my team know. The team know. I think we’re also going through a learning phase of because we did scale back of not doing events at V school, and then we’ve had a little here and there, but for 2024, we’re really focusing on events and bringing out the community. I think with V School in particular, they’ve built up such a reputation for community and collaboration and just creating space for all walks of life. It would be really unfortunate and sad if we didn’t have the events online or in person. So we’re really shifting it and putting more energy into creating online and more in person events to curate for our audience or the programs that we have, that we offer. And letting people see what V school is like, the curriculum and everything is online, but also having an in person experience helps kind of seal the deal of, oh, you can be online, but you can also have this amazing community. Like, a lot of our reviews are the V school family or the V school community. Whether it is online or here in Salt Lake, we’ve created this family and community here.

ALYSHA SMITH

Yeah.

PETER STEVENSON

I’ve been to a lot of terrible online events. Can you give me an idea of a way that people should think about creating a great online event? Is there anything, any way that you can make the world better by making better online events?

SINDEE SAVAGE

It’s really. The content obviously has to be intriguing and stellar. I think in creation of events, whether online or in person, telling a story and having a purpose, but having it relatable and knowing your audience. So if it’s online, for example, we have a webinar coming up in a couple of weeks, and it’s called our friends or your friends. So we partner with VSOs. So we have a couple that will come on and they’ll talk about all of the services that they can provide for vets.

PETER STEVENSON

Right.

SINDEE SAVAGE

So I think really fine tuning the message and very specific is helpful for the attendee or the end user. You may only have three or four people in your meeting or in your event, but who’s to say that what they hear and the information they get from that isn’t going to change or help them benefit in whatever way? Yeah, it’s hard. Events are hard. Capturing the ROI with that, and it’s really hard in events. But I’ve learned you can’t rely on that, because if you do, then we wouldn’t have it, we wouldn’t have events, we wouldn’t continue doing what we do.

ALYSHA SMITH

Well, we kind of like to end with a general idea or tip that maybe you might like to share with our marketing, our silicone slopes audience.

SINDEE SAVAGE

Yeah.

ALYSHA SMITH

Any thoughts on what you’d like to bestow upon us?

SINDEE SAVAGE

Oh, my gosh. I think that’s a great question.

ALYSHA SMITH

Something that you’ve learned? Just something.

SINDEE SAVAGE

A takeaway that probably my takeaway for me that I’ve learned just throughout my career and personal life is I’m an internal optimist and I’m always looking for opportunity. But in the workplace and at home, life’s hard. Like it really is. Everyone is struggling with something, and it’s so easy just to be like. But just trying to have a positive outlook on everything and see if something doesn’t go right. If this event didn’t execute as well or if this fell through, like, what’s the lesson learned? You have to look back at it and say, that was a crapshoot, but we learned X, Y and Z, or whatever the scenario is. But then that’s only going to help you become better as you do the next one and the next one. And just always be open to that.

ALYSHA SMITH

Yeah, I love that.

PETER STEVENSON

All right, last question. Give the people some places to go eat or drink or get a cup of coffee. Where should people be checking out?

SINDEE SAVAGE

I don’t know if I want to share that because I don’t want everybody to go.

PETER STEVENSON

Don’t share the secret places, but share the places, the people that we need to uplift the great restaurant around here.

SINDEE SAVAGE

So these are older places.

PETER STEVENSON

Great.

SINDEE SAVAGE

There’s two. Well, not one’s not the first one. It’s called italian village.

PETER STEVENSON

Oh, where’s that?

SINDEE SAVAGE

It’s a little mom and pop. It’s been around for 40 plus years.

PETER STEVENSON

Oh, my goodness.

SINDEE SAVAGE

I’ve been going there with my family. It’s in Marie. It’s on 9th east in like, gosh, I don’t know. We can drop in the location or something on the note after. Right?

PETER STEVENSON

Yeah.

SINDEE SAVAGE

So italian village. A pizza bender. It’s like a calzone, but better.

PETER STEVENSON

Okay.

SINDEE SAVAGE

It is amazing. In fact, my family’s going there tonight.

PETER STEVENSON

Okay, what is your go to? Give me a recommended order. When I show up there, I don’t.

SINDEE SAVAGE

Even look at the menu. You just get a pizza bender.

PETER STEVENSON

You just say, I need a pizza bender.

SINDEE SAVAGE

Keep a pizza bender. And sauce. And so the traditional pizza bender is pepperoni, ham and sausage. Sausage and cheese. And they have a sauce. You dip it in and you can get a combo. You can get the salad with it. Their house dressing is amazing. It’s literally like a cute grandma in the back or something. But I’ve been going there for years. And their garlic bread.

PETER STEVENSON

You guys, really, I’m so excited.

ALYSHA SMITH

My mouth is watering.

PETER STEVENSON

Okay. Italian village. All right, where else?

SINDEE SAVAGE

And the other place, the best cheeseburger that I. And I love. Cheeseburgers. Bricks corner.

PETER STEVENSON

The cheeseburger there?

SINDEE SAVAGE

Yes.

ALYSHA SMITH

We just went there for the first time.

SINDEE SAVAGE

It’s a cool place. Awesome vibe. And they have the.

PETER STEVENSON

Detroit pizza.

SINDEE SAVAGE

Yeah, no, you’ve got to get the. I literally, my mouth starts to water when you think about it.

PETER STEVENSON

Oh, my goodness.

SINDEE SAVAGE

And the tater tots.

ALYSHA SMITH

I thought to order the burger, so that is a really great tip.

PETER STEVENSON

Oh, my goodness.

SINDEE SAVAGE

Those two are my top.

PETER STEVENSON

Good.

ALYSHA SMITH

Thank you.

PETER STEVENSON

With burgers. So this is great. Well, thank you so much for being.

SINDEE SAVAGE

Here, for having me, guys. I appreciate it.

PETER STEVENSON

Thanks for all the work you do around the world.

SINDEE SAVAGE

Thank you.

ALYSHA SMITH

I’m excited to see you right back around the shop.

SINDEE SAVAGE

Yeah.

PETER STEVENSON

Bye bye.

SINDEE SAVAGE

See ya.

PETER STEVENSON

Thank you for joining us today on this episode of Buy Subject podcast. If you have any guest recommendations or other comments, you can send them to us at info@buysubjectpodcast.com buy Subject Podcast is a production of modern eight and agency in partnership with Silicon Slopes, the Mount West Capital Network. Audio production by Dave Meekham, Video production by Connor Mitchell and the music by the insanely talented Josh Johnston. If you need any place to eat, or if you need any of our old interviews, you can find that all on our website@buysubjectpodcast.com. Close.

*Pardon our transcriptions, They’re transcribed using ai.

By Subject is a production of modern8 with support from Silicon Slopes + MountainWest Capital Network.