April 30, 2024

Episode 22 Transcript | Kevin Jessop of IMA Financial Group

Kevin Jessop, director of marketing for growth operations at IMA Financial Group and President of MWCN joins host Peter Stevenson to talk about the history of MWCN, how marketing and business development can make each other better and why he would rather be marketing than be in sales. By Subject is a production of modern8 with support from Silicon Slopes + MountainWest Capital Network. For past episodes, transcripts and food recommendations visit our website at bysubjectpodcast.com

PETER STEVENSON

Welcome to buy subject. I’m your host, Peter Stevenson, and my guest today is Kevin Jessup, director of marketing for growth operations at IMA Financial Group and current president of Mountain West Capital Network. Welcome.

KEVIN JESSOP

Thank you very much.

PETER STEVENSON

Well, so you know, I’ve known you through Mountain west for the last five years, but, but tell me a little bit about, you know, where you come from, where you grew up, where you’re from. What was your early life like?

KEVIN JESSOP

You know, I was actually born in.

ALYSHA SMITH

Utah, was not raised here.

SPEAKER D

Okay.

ALYSHA SMITH

Grew up in California, the Bay Area, San Jose, and then moved to the south.

SPEAKER D

Oh, okay.

KEVIN JESSOP

So I don’t have much of an accent, but all my younger brothers and.

ALYSHA SMITH

Sisters, deep southern accent.

PETER STEVENSON

Where in the south did you move to?

ALYSHA SMITH

Well, North Carolina, Winston Salem, North Carolina.

KEVIN JESSOP

Uh, Rock Hill, South Carolina, and then.

ALYSHA SMITH

Memphis, Tennessee for a long time.

PETER STEVENSON

Was it your, your family was moving for opportunity or.

KEVIN JESSOP

My dad’s job?

ALYSHA SMITH

Yeah, he just followed the path of, you know, wherever the, the company would take him.

PETER STEVENSON

Did you love the south?

KEVIN JESSOP

Oh, you know what, when we first.

ALYSHA SMITH

Moved to the south, it was a hard, hard transition coming from California Bay.

PETER STEVENSON

Area to the south.

SPEAKER E

Yeah. Yeah.

ALYSHA SMITH

Because we thought we had that California cockiness and I thought everything was great there. Six months later, we never wanted to leave. It was just awesome.

PETER STEVENSON

So you moved first to Winston Salem?

SPEAKER E

Yeah.

PETER STEVENSON

What did you love about it?

ALYSHA SMITH

Everything. The people are just so nice, the climate’s wonderful. I mean, the summers are nice and.

KEVIN JESSOP

Muggy, you know, they’re hot. Certainly doesn’t have quite that California weather.

ALYSHA SMITH

But just kind of like a little more laid back attitude. And people seem to be more real. I don’t know. How old were you when you moved there? Oh, I was twelve years old. I got twelve.

PETER STEVENSON

Okay, so you’re just about to hit junior high and you finished high school in the South?

ALYSHA SMITH

I did.

PETER STEVENSON

And then where’d you go to college?

ALYSHA SMITH

Brigham Young University.

PETER STEVENSON

BYU?

SPEAKER E

Yeah.

PETER STEVENSON

All right, go cougs. Okay, so tell me a little bit about what did you, when you got to college, what did you want to go into? Did you have an idea what your future was?

KEVIN JESSOP

You know, my dad has been an.

ALYSHA SMITH

Accountant his whole life. I was CFO for a few different companies and so I thought I’d follow accounting.

SPEAKER E

Yeah.

KEVIN JESSOP

And so that’s what I started out.

ALYSHA SMITH

With and just didn’t love it.

KEVIN JESSOP

Went down, you know, after that first.

ALYSHA SMITH

Year, I thought, you know what, this is not great.

KEVIN JESSOP

So we switched to marketing.

PETER STEVENSON

We?

KEVIN JESSOP

Well, I say we. Yeah, I mean, like, I guess it’s just me right at that point.

PETER STEVENSON

It wasn’t like a joint decision by you and a bunch of other people?

ALYSHA SMITH

No.

SPEAKER D

Okay.

PETER STEVENSON

So you switched to marketing. And why marketing? Did you have experience with it? Did you have a class that you liked?

ALYSHA SMITH

You know, interestingly enough, there were a few classes that were really cool. One was with Mike Swenson, who still teaches at BYU. My daughter Lizzie had him there when she was going to school.

SPEAKER D

Oh, wow.

KEVIN JESSOP

I was.

ALYSHA SMITH

That was like his first or second year teaching at BYU.

PETER STEVENSON

And so you had this class by Mike Swenson and loved it. And what was the class?

ALYSHA SMITH

It was just introduction to marketing, basically.

KEVIN JESSOP

It was just, you know.

PETER STEVENSON

So what did you love about it?

ALYSHA SMITH

The stories.

SPEAKER D

Oh, okay.

SPEAKER E

Yeah.

KEVIN JESSOP

I mean, like, the experiences that he.

ALYSHA SMITH

Had used to work for DeC, which is no longer around, and a bunch of other different companies, and the stories he would tell us about the selling process. And he was a sales rep for most of these guys. He wasn’t like a traditional marketing guy.

KEVIN JESSOP

But he was teaching marketing, BYU, and.

ALYSHA SMITH

The stories of leading people through that customer journey through that sales process, just really fascinating.

PETER STEVENSON

You switch after your first year to marketing. Was the ad lab at BYU at this point, were you?

ALYSHA SMITH

No.

PETER STEVENSON

This is a long time ago, your early days. So what was that experience like at BYU? What was marketing at that time like?

ALYSHA SMITH

It was really a business degree with.

KEVIN JESSOP

I mean, technically I graduated in business school, business management with an emphasis in marketing.

SPEAKER D

Okay.

KEVIN JESSOP

That’s how they did it back then.

ALYSHA SMITH

And really that’s what it was.

KEVIN JESSOP

So you got a good, solid business.

ALYSHA SMITH

Foundation and you took like, extra marketing classes to kind of learn that side of things.

SPEAKER D

Okay. And.

PETER STEVENSON

And you loved it. Graduated, loved marketing. First job out of college was where.

KEVIN JESSOP

Was where, you know, it was actually for a.

SPEAKER E

Okay.

ALYSHA SMITH

So while going to BYU, I started working at soft copy, which is part of word perfect.

SPEAKER E

Yeah.

PETER STEVENSON

You’re a second guest who has worked at soft copy.

KEVIN JESSOP

Oh, is that.

ALYSHA SMITH

Yeah, that’s, that’s interesting.

KEVIN JESSOP

So started working there.

SPEAKER D

Okay.

ALYSHA SMITH

Worked through word perfect and then started working for the print division, which was subsequently spun off to Rr Donnelly.

SPEAKER F

Right.

PETER STEVENSON

And so you. You’re doing marketing for soft copy?

KEVIN JESSOP

No, at that time I was just an account manager.

SPEAKER D

Oh.

SPEAKER E

Just.

KEVIN JESSOP

No people.

ALYSHA SMITH

It was.

KEVIN JESSOP

Yeah, just, just managing accounts and that kind of thing.

ALYSHA SMITH

I did not go straight into marketing.

SPEAKER D

Oh, okay.

PETER STEVENSON

And did you. So you jumped into account management. Did you like it?

ALYSHA SMITH

I liked it well enough.

KEVIN JESSOP

It was not what I wanted to.

ALYSHA SMITH

Do long term good, but it was a good job and the benefits were amazing. You know, our first two kids, I.

KEVIN JESSOP

Mean, like, insure health insurance these days.

ALYSHA SMITH

Super expensive.

SPEAKER E

Yeah.

ALYSHA SMITH

Those first two kids were five dollar babies.

SPEAKER F

Right, right.

PETER STEVENSON

And they.

ALYSHA SMITH

You paid a copay for that very first payment for that very first visit. And the rest was just totally paid for policy discussions.

PETER STEVENSON

We go down here, but we’re not going to. So let’s. So do you ever call your kids $5 babies?

SPEAKER D

Oh, yeah. Okay, good.

PETER STEVENSON

So you get spun out to another company. When did you first jump into marketing?

ALYSHA SMITH

Then again, okay, so I was with Donnelly as an account manager for a few years, and they were subsequently sold. The print division was sold to just some private investors. And then Donnelly started up a financial printing office in Salt Lake City.

SPEAKER D

Okay.

ALYSHA SMITH

And they called and said, hey, we’d like you to, you know, help Jeff Stamper start this, this new shop here in Salt Lake.

KEVIN JESSOP

And I really liked finance. I thought that was, you know, super intriguing.

ALYSHA SMITH

And so I kind of had both.

KEVIN JESSOP

Sides of it there.

ALYSHA SMITH

Started out doing account management and then moved into sales.

PETER STEVENSON

And so what kind of stuff were you printing? So what is financial printing at this time?

ALYSHA SMITH

Financial printing is kind of a weird animal. A printed product is the end result, but the services you’re selling are really the management of that process from when the deal starts to, you know, when.

KEVIN JESSOP

You, when you’ve got that, you know.

ALYSHA SMITH

Whether it’s an IPO or a secondary.

KEVIN JESSOP

Offering or 144 a or whatever that.

ALYSHA SMITH

Is, whatever the goal there is, you know, you’ve got this printed piece at the end, but it’s all of the changes, and this is early days of almost computing where they didn’t have secure.

KEVIN JESSOP

Systems to, you know, make all these.

ALYSHA SMITH

Changes to the documents, that kind of stuff.

SPEAKER F

Right.

ALYSHA SMITH

Everything was a freaking manual process.

SPEAKER E

Yeah.

ALYSHA SMITH

What was your first computer? My first computer what first computer you bought.

KEVIN JESSOP

It was leading edge 486.

PETER STEVENSON

Oh, all right. Old school.

ALYSHA SMITH

Oh, yeah.

PETER STEVENSON

You learn dos?

ALYSHA SMITH

Oh, sure, yeah, yeah. Okay.

KEVIN JESSOP

So I’m old enough that back in.

ALYSHA SMITH

The days when word perfect was starting out, you’d access some of these features. You’d go to spell check, and it would prompt you to insert disk seven.

SPEAKER F

Right.

KEVIN JESSOP

You know, floppy into the floppy drive.

PETER STEVENSON

I remember my dad was a programmer during that same era, and I remember we had this old computer that we, he would, taught us to run Dos on. I wish I could remember any of that stuff now, but it was, I.

KEVIN JESSOP

Mean, I was like a six year.

PETER STEVENSON

Old kid running dos, and it was awesome. And I miss it. I miss that, like, level of, like, intrigue into a system. I don’t see that anymore.

ALYSHA SMITH

It was those early days that kind of kept me on a. I don’t.

KEVIN JESSOP

Know, a keyboard centric path, you know.

ALYSHA SMITH

For lots of years.

PETER STEVENSON

And so, okay, so you’re getting really deep into financial management. You’re doing account managing sales. And did you, were you still down in Utah county or did you move up to Salt Lake?

KEVIN JESSOP

No, I’ve lived in Utah county my whole married life, basically.

PETER STEVENSON

Okay, but you’re working up here selling financial printing. How, when, what years were. What years was this?

KEVIN JESSOP

Uh, late 1990s.

SPEAKER D

Okay.

ALYSHA SMITH

Early two thousands.

KEVIN JESSOP

So. So during the.com bubble.

SPEAKER E

Yeah.

PETER STEVENSON

So you had some fun times and some not fun times.

ALYSHA SMITH

Oh, yeah, absolutely.

KEVIN JESSOP

I mean, it was great. I mean, like, the.

ALYSHA SMITH

The dot coms that were coming through were just, you know, everything was new.

KEVIN JESSOP

And exciting and they were like great companies to chase.

ALYSHA SMITH

When we started out, Jeff Semper, Jeff.

KEVIN JESSOP

Stamper was main sales rep and I was the account manager. And then I moved, moved in and.

ALYSHA SMITH

Took over the sales role and we.

KEVIN JESSOP

Hired some more folks and then we.

ALYSHA SMITH

Had the, you know, the bust.

PETER STEVENSON

When did you join Mountains Capital Network?

KEVIN JESSOP

1996 was the first time that I.

ALYSHA SMITH

Started, you know, helping with the group.

PETER STEVENSON

And was that, was that when you went to this?

KEVIN JESSOP

I was with, working for Donnelly Financial at the time.

ALYSHA SMITH

So we, we, Donnelly financial at the time printed that first.

PETER STEVENSON

The first deal flow book or deal.

KEVIN JESSOP

Flow pamphlet is really what it was.

SPEAKER F

Right, right.

PETER STEVENSON

So that’s. Okay. So interesting. Like, because that was around the time that Mountain west got started, was early nineties, right?

SPEAKER E

Yeah.

PETER STEVENSON

Okay, and what was it that drew you to Mount West Capital network, as you know? Was it you knew somebody there? Was it an opportunity you couldn’t turn down?

ALYSHA SMITH

Well, really? Okay, so in those early days working.

KEVIN JESSOP

For Donnelly Financial, I mean, like every.

ALYSHA SMITH

New company, every Internet ipo, we were all chasing that. And because when I say we, all of the people that were involved in.

KEVIN JESSOP

Mountain west, they were, some of them.

ALYSHA SMITH

Were true deal makers, you know, putting.

KEVIN JESSOP

Deals together and drafting documents, that kind of thing.

ALYSHA SMITH

Half of them were wanna be deal makers. They wanted to be in on that stuff. And so together, we were all chasing the same companies. And so it kind of made sense to kind of band together.

PETER STEVENSON

And you were a service provider of those deals and so you needed to be around the people making those decisions.

ALYSHA SMITH

We needed to know who the decision.

KEVIN JESSOP

Makers were and gain a level of trust.

ALYSHA SMITH

Really?

SPEAKER E

Yeah.

PETER STEVENSON

Okay, so you go through the.com bust. How long after that did you stay selling financial printing?

ALYSHA SMITH

Well, okay, so Donnelly made, you know, sadly, it was a good decision.

KEVIN JESSOP

They said, you know what?

SPEAKER E

We.

ALYSHA SMITH

We don’t have. We have way less than half the business we used to.

KEVIN JESSOP

Yeah, Salt Lake’s a great market, but.

ALYSHA SMITH

We can service it from afar.

KEVIN JESSOP

They shut down the office even though we’d just begun, you know, a five.

ALYSHA SMITH

Year lease on some beautiful space. And so they allowed me to continue working there as I, you know, looked for another option. They. They had some options to move back to Chicago.

SPEAKER D

Okay.

ALYSHA SMITH

With the company, but that wasn’t really attractive to me.

SPEAKER F

Right.

PETER STEVENSON

Okay, and so where did you go next?

KEVIN JESSOP

You know, I was in that office working and.

ALYSHA SMITH

Or, you know, when I say working, working. Looking for a job.

SPEAKER E

Yeah.

ALYSHA SMITH

And Spence Hoole, who was with diversified insurance, he was leading it. Then he came in, and, you know, Spence and I would have lunch together from time to time because we were also chasing a lot of the same.

KEVIN JESSOP

Companies, and we would just trade leads.

ALYSHA SMITH

And, you know, get intel. And he said, so, how’s business? I said, well, as a matter of fact, you know, it’s not great for us personally here. But, you know, he goes, well, have you ever thought of insurance? I said, absolutely not.

SPEAKER F

Right.

SPEAKER E

Yeah.

SPEAKER D

Okay.

ALYSHA SMITH

Nobody thinks when they’re little that they’re going to grow up to work in insurance. Nobody aspires to that.

PETER STEVENSON

No, I. One time I was talking to this guy who. He was an embalmer, or what are those people called? And I remember saying, did you want to do this when you were a kid?

ALYSHA SMITH

And he was like, yeah.

PETER STEVENSON

And I was like, oh, that was not the answer I expected.

KEVIN JESSOP

That had to be a family connection is what I’m thinking.

PETER STEVENSON

Yeah, yeah, exactly. A mortician like his dad, was it? And I was like, oh, man, I can’t even imagine that. But, yeah, the same sort of idea. Like, no one grows up thinking like, oh, yeah, I want to do that. And so, okay, so you didn’t have any idea, but I know your story. And you ended up at diversified, so you went over with what role?

ALYSHA SMITH

Initially it was as a sales Rep.

SPEAKER D

Okay.

KEVIN JESSOP

And, you know, it didn’t.

ALYSHA SMITH

It didn’t work out because insurance is a fairly complicated animal.

SPEAKER E

Yeah.

KEVIN JESSOP

And the pitch that we had really.

ALYSHA SMITH

Was, we’re smarter, more knowledgeable than everybody else.

SPEAKER F

Right.

KEVIN JESSOP

And I certainly was not in those early days.

SPEAKER F

Right.

KEVIN JESSOP

I mean, like, all my contacts were.

ALYSHA SMITH

With these pre IPO companies and, you know, recently public companies, and I personally had no idea how to, you know, manage those insurance needs.

SPEAKER E

Yeah.

PETER STEVENSON

And so you’re selling. What kind of insurance were you selling at that time?

ALYSHA SMITH

Property and casualty insurance for, you know, tech companies.

SPEAKER D

Okay.

ALYSHA SMITH

Diversified in the early days, you know, we’re, we’re still actually a relatively new company.

SPEAKER E

Yeah.

KEVIN JESSOP

You know, when I say relatively, I.

ALYSHA SMITH

Mean, 30 years is, you know, relatively new here and, you know, in this valley. And so there were a lot of long term insurance agents that were here, had established practices and tech was the new thing and.

SPEAKER F

Right.

ALYSHA SMITH

You know, they need there.

KEVIN JESSOP

It was kind of an opening, and so we jumped in there.

ALYSHA SMITH

I say we, being diversified, jumped in there and were able to do a little bit of handholding. It was that customer service angle that.

KEVIN JESSOP

We pitched and that we really honed quite well. I mean, there are a lot of.

ALYSHA SMITH

Unique needs that tech companies have and those emerging growth companies have.

KEVIN JESSOP

And we were able to, you know.

ALYSHA SMITH

In those first couple years, you may.

KEVIN JESSOP

Not be making any money, but hopefully.

ALYSHA SMITH

As they grow, you know, year 2345, after they become public.

SPEAKER F

Right.

ALYSHA SMITH

You know, you can make some money.

KEVIN JESSOP

There and it’s actually a great business.

PETER STEVENSON

What, what were some of the skills that you learned as a marketing student that carried over and made you, you know, at least somewhat successful in that, you know, sales and management of accounts.

ALYSHA SMITH

Type of role, you know, being attuned.

KEVIN JESSOP

To the customer’s needs, really figuring out.

ALYSHA SMITH

Who your customer is, what they need.

KEVIN JESSOP

From you, and, you know, meeting those needs.

SPEAKER D

Okay.

ALYSHA SMITH

I mean, really, you know, marketing.

KEVIN JESSOP

So you’ve got like this, you know, the marketing funnel.

SPEAKER E

Yeah.

ALYSHA SMITH

You know, we’re all familiar with that.

SPEAKER F

Right.

KEVIN JESSOP

You’ve got that awareness, you know, the.

ALYSHA SMITH

Education you’ve got, you know, everybody puts.

KEVIN JESSOP

Different labels sometimes on, you know, some.

ALYSHA SMITH

Of those layers, but, you know, the awareness, you know, the ads, the social media outreach, that kind of stuff, that’s all part of it. But really it’s when you start getting into the education and the areas where you’re working with them and you’re developing a level of trust because you have information that they need.

SPEAKER E

Yeah.

PETER STEVENSON

And so understanding that customer was a big part of your learning in school that helped you drive your business success over the next ten years or so. And so you mentioned it didn’t work out as sales at diversified. So when did you make the jump into marketing?

ALYSHA SMITH

Pretty quickly on a year and a half in sales was not great. Sales, insurance sales has got to have the absolute worst sales cycle of any industry out there.

KEVIN JESSOP

You’ve got all these renewal dates, and.

ALYSHA SMITH

Every time you meet with the company, it’s like, oh, well, we either just went through a renewal or, or we’re.

KEVIN JESSOP

You know, nine months out.

SPEAKER F

Right, right.

KEVIN JESSOP

And so, you know, that was also.

ALYSHA SMITH

Confusing to me at the, in the beginning, because it just seemed that every company that you met with, all these contacts that you had of people that you knew well, that you were friends.

KEVIN JESSOP

With, you know, it was never the right time.

ALYSHA SMITH

It seemed right.

KEVIN JESSOP

And, you know, understanding that cycle, actually.

ALYSHA SMITH

It’S a disadvantage if you’re a new person starting out in that industry, and it’s a big advantage once you’re entrenched, once you’ve got a good client base.

KEVIN JESSOP

And it’s harder for them to leave.

ALYSHA SMITH

You, partly because it’s a tough cycle.

SPEAKER F

Right, right.

PETER STEVENSON

Yeah. One of my good friends, we were hanging out over the weekend, and he sells insurance, same property. He’s like, I am ready to get out of it. He’s like, I make enough money, but it’s not a fun life. And I was like, all right, I get it.

KEVIN JESSOP

You know, now I’d say it’s actually.

ALYSHA SMITH

A pretty good industry to be in.

PETER STEVENSON

Really?

SPEAKER E

Oh, yeah.

KEVIN JESSOP

I highly recommend it to lots of folks.

ALYSHA SMITH

Back in those early days, also, we had the disadvantage of being small enough that there was no real training program. Yeah, it was kind of.

KEVIN JESSOP

You were kind of on your own.

SPEAKER F

Right.

ALYSHA SMITH

Didn’t have a lot of help.

KEVIN JESSOP

You know, everybody said, oh, yeah, you.

ALYSHA SMITH

Can come with me to appointments or this and that, but.

SPEAKER F

Right.

KEVIN JESSOP

You know, now we’ve got an actually.

ALYSHA SMITH

High quality training, organized training program to bring people on and to help them through the system, to help them learn the ins and outs of insurance.

KEVIN JESSOP

You know, it’s not merely being good.

ALYSHA SMITH

Enough to pass that insurance exam, which is a pretty low bar, but.

SPEAKER F

Right.

ALYSHA SMITH

You know.

PETER STEVENSON

Okay, so you jump into marketing.

SPEAKER D

What? What?

PETER STEVENSON

Like, what kind of stuff were you doing for marketing for insurance in those early years? Are you mostly just sales support? Are you out trying to find new leads for your sales team? What was that like in the early two thousands?

KEVIN JESSOP

All of the above.

ALYSHA SMITH

In a firm our size, we were probably 50 ish people back then, maybe 40.

KEVIN JESSOP

You end up wearing a lot of hats.

ALYSHA SMITH

Because I was kind of technically oriented. I was also the head of it, so to speak.

KEVIN JESSOP

You also end up, you know, you just.

ALYSHA SMITH

All those things that you just know a little bit more than everybody else, you end up taking on those responsibilities also, so.

SPEAKER F

Right.

KEVIN JESSOP

You know, we were doing a lot.

ALYSHA SMITH

It was kind of self support, but even more than self support, it was, you know, developing presentations and interesting content. I had to learn insurance.

SPEAKER E

Yeah.

KEVIN JESSOP

When I say learn insurance, I mean.

ALYSHA SMITH

Like, be able to produce content that was engaging and educational.

SPEAKER F

Right.

KEVIN JESSOP

You know, which is.

ALYSHA SMITH

Which is something that I really lacked. All those things that I needed to.

KEVIN JESSOP

Succeed as an early sales rep, I.

ALYSHA SMITH

Had to develop, or, you know, over the years, developed for the other reps that were there. Right.

PETER STEVENSON

You had to create that for them because you knew you wanted it.

SPEAKER E

Yeah, exactly.

PETER STEVENSON

And so, okay, so, and you’re. So at the time, diversified was a pretty small player in the market. Was it located here in the state?

ALYSHA SMITH

Yeah, diversified has always been so diversified. It’s been Utah centric. It started, it actually started with a group of folks that were at Aon and is one of those big insurance brokers. Mass evaluations. We were not even a rounding error in their book.

KEVIN JESSOP

We were that small when they decided.com bubble.

ALYSHA SMITH

Also, when they decided to pull out of Salt Lake, Joe Henroyd and Spence Hoole said, hey, we think we got a good thing here. Can we buy the book of business from you? Aion Aon was initially resistant, but thanks to a stroke of luck and a lack of non compete for one of those early guys, it worked. It worked.

PETER STEVENSON

I love those lack of non compete stays.

ALYSHA SMITH

Oh, I know.

PETER STEVENSON

That would be a great podcast. I would listen to stories about people who didn’t have a non compete, who competed against their former company.

KEVIN JESSOP

And they certainly tried to get them.

ALYSHA SMITH

To sign a non compete also when.

KEVIN JESSOP

They realized that they didn’t have that in place.

SPEAKER F

Right.

PETER STEVENSON

Okay, so this middle of two thousands through, you know, that was a wild couple of years in the marketing front. Everybody’s starting to learn the online space you’re getting into buying on Google and social media. What was the b two b space like in marketing during those years? What were you doing? What were the tools you were utilizing as a b two b marketer?

ALYSHA SMITH

You know, in those early days, it’s, insurance has always been and still is.

KEVIN JESSOP

To a large degree, you know, relationship driven.

SPEAKER F

Right.

ALYSHA SMITH

And so it very much was then. So, you know, it’s, it’s not just.

KEVIN JESSOP

What you know, but who you know.

SPEAKER F

Right.

ALYSHA SMITH

But once it’s, once you get past.

KEVIN JESSOP

That, you know, hey, I know you, you trust me.

ALYSHA SMITH

You have to have some real substance behind you. You have to have those educational tools.

KEVIN JESSOP

Whether it’s a personal story that you’re relating or ideally, you know, like a.

ALYSHA SMITH

Presentation that you can share with them and they can pass on to somebody else.

SPEAKER F

Right.

ALYSHA SMITH

I mean, in a perfect world, you.

KEVIN JESSOP

Know, you’re meeting with that one decision maker.

ALYSHA SMITH

But frequently it’s not just the controller, it’s not just this CFO that you’re working with, but it’s a whole committee of folks. And so you may you may have sold, so to speak, or worked with a particular person who’s on your side who says, hey, I think we want to move forward.

SPEAKER E

Yeah.

KEVIN JESSOP

But you’ve got to see, you know, the CEO and others that, you know.

ALYSHA SMITH

Often a general counsel that play a role in that decision as well.

SPEAKER F

Right.

PETER STEVENSON

And looking at the bottom line, making sure that they can trust you. What was the competitive advantage you had at diversified in the late 2010s that you felt like you were able to close business and grow as diversified?

ALYSHA SMITH

Partly it was the space we played and we had a higher level of technical expertise to ensure software companies and these emerging growth companies. Most people, you know, that don’t have software companies don’t understand the risks involved in, you know, your software failing. Yeah, that kind of a thing. Insurance is a contract between two parties that, you know, outlines the risks and determines, you know, specific coverages or specific instances. If you don’t have that technical knowledge to be able to, you know, make sure that the words are saying what they should be right, then, you know, you’re. You really can’t be a good insurance broker. You can’t be a good agent. You can’t represent that client in. In the right way and make sure that they’re covered. We’re assuming, you know, because in the. As an independent insurance agent, you know, we work with a lot of different companies.

SPEAKER F

Right.

KEVIN JESSOP

Chubb travelers, you know, all the big guys.

ALYSHA SMITH

Sure. And so we assume that whoever is working with that company is going to get the best price.

SPEAKER F

Right.

KEVIN JESSOP

And that’s not, you know, we assume.

ALYSHA SMITH

That that’s the assumptive.

KEVIN JESSOP

But really what we can do is.

ALYSHA SMITH

Get you that best price with the proper coverage, with all of those extras, so to speak, that, you know, if you’re a less sophisticated insurance agent, you aren’t even aware of.

SPEAKER E

Yeah.

PETER STEVENSON

You don’t know the risks specifically of a specific market or a specific type of software or whatever.

SPEAKER E

Yeah, yeah.

PETER STEVENSON

We have a client that is like a baby product company, and they have to. They end up having to switch their insurance every year because they just keep getting dropped to every year, every year they want to cover them. So anyway, maybe I’ll introduce you.

KEVIN JESSOP

And also, you know, executive risk. That’s another area that we excel in.

ALYSHA SMITH

Director and officer liability, that kind of thing.

SPEAKER D

Okay.

ALYSHA SMITH

There are huge changes that every company goes through in both their exposure basis and, well, as a result, premiums when they move from a privately held company to a public company.

SPEAKER F

Right.

KEVIN JESSOP

And there’s really only a handful of.

ALYSHA SMITH

People here in the state of Utah that do that well, manage that.

KEVIN JESSOP

And I think we’re the best that do it right.

PETER STEVENSON

And so, okay, so you had to learn all this stuff. You had to learn how to talk about what made you special. How did you learn about what diversified was better at and how did you develop the core competency to go out and share that message? As director of marketing for diversified, spending.

ALYSHA SMITH

A lot of time with the rest, spending a lot of time with these tech companies and figuring out what, what their needs are in the specific covers, Spenceful is hugely beneficial to me and to actually every, every rep that he’s worked with. I mean, he’s a great communicator and.

KEVIN JESSOP

He welcomes you to, you know, sit down on any sales meeting he has.

ALYSHA SMITH

With any client anywhere.

PETER STEVENSON

And so you would go to sales meetings. You’d spend a lot of time, you know, actually digging in and doing those interviews. Can you think of a time that like you had like an aha moment in one of those sales meetings? You’re like, oh, I’m going to steal that and use it in some other stuff?

KEVIN JESSOP

Oh, just about every meeting, some little nugget that it’s like, oh, yeah, we’re going to, we’re going to write that.

ALYSHA SMITH

Down and, you know, and use it.

PETER STEVENSON

In all of our other places. Okay, so tell me about Mountain west capital network in the, in this era, did you stay involved, you know, in the meetings? We always joke that you’re the longest, you and France, you’re the longest running members. So what was it like during that era? You definitely have a history and a background there. What was mountainwith Capitol Network doing in that time? What were you doing as an officer.

ALYSHA SMITH

With that group back in those days? It was a great group of folks.

KEVIN JESSOP

David Ingebauer, Scott Nixon.

ALYSHA SMITH

There were a lot of good folks, Brad Burtosh among them. They were all looking for, you know, they were all looking to grow the pie.

SPEAKER E

Yeah.

ALYSHA SMITH

Not just get their piece of the pie, but to grow that pie.

PETER STEVENSON

What do you mean by pie? Grow the, the state of Utah pie.

ALYSHA SMITH

Like the state of Utah pie. Grow the deals and the deal network and the companies promote the right environment.

SPEAKER F

Right.

ALYSHA SMITH

So these companies could thrive and, and do well with all of their needs being met by Utah companies.

SPEAKER F

Right.

KEVIN JESSOP

When I say Utah companies, it might.

ALYSHA SMITH

Be an out of state firm that has a local office, but in those early days, local folks did not have the expertise to handle a lot of those complex transactions. So every ipo in 1999 was done.

KEVIN JESSOP

By an outside law firm.

ALYSHA SMITH

It seemed.

SPEAKER F

Right.

SPEAKER D

Okay. Okay.

PETER STEVENSON

And there probably weren’t that many of them either. You know that 99. How many ipos in the state of Utah were there?

SPEAKER E

Oh, heck, I don’t know.

ALYSHA SMITH

There were. There were enough to keep people in business.

SPEAKER D

Okay.

ALYSHA SMITH

You know, nothing like today’s world.

SPEAKER D

Okay.

PETER STEVENSON

And so, and so the goal at that time was to develop the muscle memory, to do the work that it took to do m and a and ipo and all the other type of deal flow. And so who was who? Why did you stay involved with it as an insurance marketing person?

ALYSHA SMITH

So as when?

KEVIN JESSOP

Okay.

ALYSHA SMITH

In my prior life with Donnelly Financial.

KEVIN JESSOP

We worked on a lot of ipos, second day offerings, that kind of thing.

ALYSHA SMITH

So I learned the language there.

KEVIN JESSOP

That’s where we started, you know, with.

ALYSHA SMITH

I started with Mount west capital network in those days. And so the deal flow from early on has been kind of near and dear to my heart, partly because that information was very critical to succeeding and.

KEVIN JESSOP

What we were after, being able to.

ALYSHA SMITH

Track those deals and know who the players are and who the influencers are.

KEVIN JESSOP

And then once I moved to diversified.

ALYSHA SMITH

In those early days, once again, we were still tracking those same companies. Being able to speak the language with the CFO’s and these centers of influence was huge, hugely beneficial in gaining their.

KEVIN JESSOP

Trust and being able to follow the.

ALYSHA SMITH

Deals and explain the specific coverages that they need, insurance coverage. They need to handle the risks that they were.

PETER STEVENSON

So were you bringing on other diversified employees and salespeople to the meetings and kind of dragging people there, or were you bringing the deals and the information back to your organization?

ALYSHA SMITH

Sales and marketing were almost one in the same in those early years, right? I mean, we.

KEVIN JESSOP

It was, it was very much a team environment. You know, when we needed to, when.

ALYSHA SMITH

We targeted a specific company, we all had our assignments, but it was a group effort.

KEVIN JESSOP

And that’s something that’s actually something very.

ALYSHA SMITH

Cool and a little unique about diversified now, IMa is, it is very much a team environment. Old school insurance agencies are very siloed and.

SPEAKER F

Right.

ALYSHA SMITH

Each individual producer looks after themselves with their own single account manager and account exec, and that kind of thing is very siloed. We’ve always been team players, and so everybody pitches in and helps on all accounts.

PETER STEVENSON

And so you got to be involved in a lot of that and knew the people from your work with Mountain West Capital Network, you knew the other players in the organization. And so as more money started to get poured into the state, as the knowledge about how to do some of this m and a and IPO work came here locally, what was the growth of Mountain west, like in the 2010s, through 2020s.

ALYSHA SMITH

It’s actually been steady growth all through the years. We’ve been fortunate enough to lead the nation with a good economy and a lot of entrepreneurs. As I mentioned in those early years.

KEVIN JESSOP

You know, I worked for word perfect.

ALYSHA SMITH

I worked for Novell, technically, for a.

KEVIN JESSOP

Time, just because, you know, Novell bought word perfect.

ALYSHA SMITH

Right. And those companies seeded so many new companies.

SPEAKER E

Yeah.

ALYSHA SMITH

There was lots of business. And, you know, those new companies, as I mentioned, when they’re, when they’re little, they’re not money makers for an inch insurance agency.

SPEAKER F

Right, right.

KEVIN JESSOP

But we were able to, you know.

ALYSHA SMITH

Work with them, hold their hands through that life cycle, through that growth cycle, and, you know, get some, some real fans. Raving fans, we like to call them.

SPEAKER F

Right.

KEVIN JESSOP

That said, hey, you know, every person that they would meet, you know, when.

ALYSHA SMITH

You help somebody through not just getting the right coverage, but when you help people through tough claims.

SPEAKER F

Right.

ALYSHA SMITH

You know, sure. Tenfold. And there’s a lot of claim stories.

KEVIN JESSOP

That we won’t relate here, but.

PETER STEVENSON

Right.

SPEAKER F

Right.

ALYSHA SMITH

When.

KEVIN JESSOP

When software fails and there are tens of millions of dollars, sometimes hundreds of.

ALYSHA SMITH

Millions of dollars in claims paid out.

SPEAKER F

Right.

ALYSHA SMITH

You develop really strong relationships with those folks.

SPEAKER F

Right.

PETER STEVENSON

Because you get to be, you know, you’re essentially a third party administrator.

ALYSHA SMITH

Right.

PETER STEVENSON

So you’re. You’re. You are the one dealing with understanding the, you know, the insurance and making sure your clients get what they need. And, you know, but you.

SPEAKER E

Yeah.

ALYSHA SMITH

When in insurance, it’s kind of as a broker, you’re kind of in a unique position because technically you represent the insurance carrier.

SPEAKER F

Right.

ALYSHA SMITH

But when there’s a claim, you really have to be. Your value is by being an advocate for the client.

SPEAKER F

Right. Right.

ALYSHA SMITH

By being. By making sure that not just the policy language is followed. Because there are lots of opportunities because.

KEVIN JESSOP

Of the nuances of, you know, insurance.

ALYSHA SMITH

Contracts, that kind of stuff, where insurance companies are technically able to decline coverage.

SPEAKER F

Sure.

ALYSHA SMITH

But if you are, if you can successfully argue that the intent of the coverage, you know, is this.

SPEAKER E

Yeah.

ALYSHA SMITH

Then you can, you know, we’ve moved the needle on some really big claims.

SPEAKER D

Okay.

PETER STEVENSON

And so that gets you to be. Have raving fans and sell diversified. And so what was Mountain west capital network like? What, you know, what did deal flow look like? Early years was a pamphlet. Now it’s a book that’s a nightmare to put together.

KEVIN JESSOP

But as you well know.

PETER STEVENSON

Yeah, as I well know. But why that growth that you saw over the past 30 years, what has it been like to watch, you know, seen like the, you know, you’ve been heavily involved in all, you know, deals of in Utah for 30 years. Has it been a lot of fun to watch that growth?

ALYSHA SMITH

Oh, it’s been super cool.

SPEAKER E

Yeah.

PETER STEVENSON

What is the reason that it’s grown so much? From your opinion?

ALYSHA SMITH

From my opinion, yeah.

KEVIN JESSOP

Really.

ALYSHA SMITH

It’s the entrepreneurial spirit of Utahns in general. You’ve got kind of a unique community here.

SPEAKER E

Yeah.

ALYSHA SMITH

There’s a lot of self sufficiency, but it’s a highly educated, you know, right. Demographic where self sufficiency doesn’t mean that you have to go, you know, produce.

KEVIN JESSOP

Your own food and build your own.

ALYSHA SMITH

You know, homes and that kind of thing. But you take the skills that, you.

KEVIN JESSOP

Know, because you’ve gone to college, because you’ve got, you know, a computer science degree or whatever.

SPEAKER E

Yeah.

ALYSHA SMITH

And you think, you know what, I can. I can build a better mousetrap.

SPEAKER F

Right.

ALYSHA SMITH

Happens to be a software mousetrap. Right.

SPEAKER F

Right.

PETER STEVENSON

So that spirit of entrepreneurship and the ability from those early wins. Word perfect. And some of those other big exits in the nineties and early two thousands. And that spread of money when those.

ALYSHA SMITH

Early companies and when venture capital came in, they seeded a lot of businesses with money. I mean, you need money to start.

PETER STEVENSON

And we’re in like third round of those for third generation of those exits now. And do you see this continuing?

ALYSHA SMITH

Oh, absolutely.

SPEAKER E

Yeah.

ALYSHA SMITH

I mean, lots of, lots of people outside the state of Utah look to Utah kind of as a model to.

KEVIN JESSOP

Emulate where once a hundred percent of.

ALYSHA SMITH

Our deals were handled by external law firms, big law firms from Chicago and.

KEVIN JESSOP

New York and the Bay Area, as.

ALYSHA SMITH

Well as the money sources, primarily from the Bay Area, Silicon Valley.

KEVIN JESSOP

We’ve now got that full infrastructure here.

ALYSHA SMITH

Locally, and they’re sophisticated and they do well. And it’s that virtuous cycle. It just builds on itself.

PETER STEVENSON

Let me ask the other side of the question. What do you think are the spaces that we still need more knowledge and infrastructure and education to make us even better?

ALYSHA SMITH

You know, we’re a highly educated population.

KEVIN JESSOP

But we’ve still got challenges with our demographic, demographic growth rate.

SPEAKER D

Okay.

ALYSHA SMITH

We have, you know, relative to the amount of spending per pupil. Yeah, we do well, but, you know, partly we’re kind of tapped out. I mean, we also spend the largest portion of our budget on education. Sure. As a percentage compared to all the other states.

SPEAKER F

Right.

ALYSHA SMITH

So even though the per pupil spending is low as a percentage of our overall government, it’s rather high.

SPEAKER F

Right.

SPEAKER E

Yeah.

KEVIN JESSOP

So we’ve got to kind of, you know, we’ve got to kind of tread.

ALYSHA SMITH

That fine line and provide better, better education. Opportunities for education, especially post secondary education.

PETER STEVENSON

Post secondary education.

KEVIN JESSOP

Or, you know, once they’ve left high school.

SPEAKER D

Okay.

PETER STEVENSON

So the secret for future growth is really that ability for post secondary education and more opportunities for people to go to some sort of secondary education.

SPEAKER E

Yeah.

PETER STEVENSON

College, trade school, whatever that is.

SPEAKER E

Yeah.

PETER STEVENSON

Are you involved in any of that type of thing? Do you help out with that or are you just too busy with Mount west?

ALYSHA SMITH

Not as much as I’d like.

KEVIN JESSOP

I track it pretty closely.

ALYSHA SMITH

I mean, like, we’ve got some great universities. They’re doing really good things.

SPEAKER E

Yeah.

ALYSHA SMITH

I’ve got two boys that are at Utah State.

KEVIN JESSOP

I’ve had two girls graduate from BYU. My boys right now are up there.

ALYSHA SMITH

Just having a really good experience. When I say good experience, I mean a great educational experience.

KEVIN JESSOP

And, you know, quite frankly, I think.

ALYSHA SMITH

It’S probably the best campus, college campus experience here in the state of Utah. UVU is growing just leaps and bounds.

KEVIN JESSOP

I mean, no one wants.

ALYSHA SMITH

They’re not campus, though.

KEVIN JESSOP

They’re now the biggest university in Utah.

SPEAKER F

Right.

KEVIN JESSOP

And, you know, they’re.

ALYSHA SMITH

They’re still trying to find their way.

KEVIN JESSOP

In a lot of ways, though.

SPEAKER E

Yeah.

PETER STEVENSON

I love the Utah State campus. It is a phenomenal area. If it wasn’t so cold, I’d go there more often.

SPEAKER E

Yeah.

PETER STEVENSON

But I’m excited. I’m really excited about what Utah tech is doing down in St. George. I think that rebrand and kind of their repositioning themselves as a tech university is exciting. And I see some great stuff coming out of that space.

ALYSHA SMITH

Super exciting.

KEVIN JESSOP

That’s something that they really needed. They needed to get away from that.

ALYSHA SMITH

Party school kind of moniker and really focus on education. I think they’re doing a much better job these days.

PETER STEVENSON

A couple of things. This will come out right before the deal flow. So tell us, do you know the day of the deal flow?

ALYSHA SMITH

The day of the deal flow? Is it May 15?

PETER STEVENSON

May 15, that’s right. Where is it going to be at?

ALYSHA SMITH

Is it going to be in the Grand America?

SPEAKER E

No.

SPEAKER D

Oh, hold on.

ALYSHA SMITH

What am I saying?

SPEAKER D

What are you doing?

KEVIN JESSOP

Yeah, no, it’s going to be the Kengar building. We’re going to have to edit that part.

PETER STEVENSON

Yeah, that’s all right. Where do you get tickets? Mountain west capital network.

ALYSHA SMITH

Mountain west. Mwcn.org.

PETER STEVENSON

One of the things I want to say this about MWCN as an organization, the ability to be welcomed into a community is, is better in that group of people than almost any other organization I’ve been a part of, they are, as an organization, it is welcome and friendly and caring, and everybody is. The way I describe it to some people is it’s the British Bake off show. But in business, like, everybody’s cheering each other on to make the world better. And so I do really, really think that more people should get involved, come to more of the events, and find a way to be networked with that group.

KEVIN JESSOP

No, I absolutely agree.

ALYSHA SMITH

In fact, something that I haven’t really touched on. But centers of influence have been key to our success at diversified and now IMA. I mean, we’re encouraged to, when I say we, like all of the employees, all the associates, are encouraged to participate in these organizations, but really to participate.

KEVIN JESSOP

Them in a way that they can.

ALYSHA SMITH

Be truly useful both to the organization and to get that back. I mean, like, we don’t want to just write a check and sponsor something.

KEVIN JESSOP

We want to be a part of it. We want to get in the trenches.

ALYSHA SMITH

And do the work, be where we can make an influence or be influential.

KEVIN JESSOP

I happen to be the president of Mountain west. Now, I’ve been with this organization a long time.

ALYSHA SMITH

Kevin Heyer, another member of our firm, current president of ACG Utah.

PETER STEVENSON

You know, they’re taking over the service.

KEVIN JESSOP

Provider networks, you know, in a lot of ways.

ALYSHA SMITH

And so the goal there is really to provide value to those organizations, develop contacts.

KEVIN JESSOP

So, you know, once you’ve got that.

ALYSHA SMITH

Trust, that level of trust.

SPEAKER E

You know.

ALYSHA SMITH

Really, it may not be imminent, but.

KEVIN JESSOP

At some point, everybody’s going to be our client. Right?

SPEAKER F

Right.

SPEAKER D

Okay.

PETER STEVENSON

So we always end with two questions. First, one is like, give some advice to young, up and coming marketers. What would you suggest for, what is some advice for, you know, somebody getting into the b two b, marketing space? Service provider. B two B. Service provider marketing.

KEVIN JESSOP

Service provider marketing.

PETER STEVENSON

Because that’s what you are. You’re a service provider.

KEVIN JESSOP

No, very much so.

SPEAKER E

Yeah. Yeah.

KEVIN JESSOP

I mean, like, and to be honest, our goal at Ima, Salt Lake City.

ALYSHA SMITH

Is really not to be the best insurance agent, you know, insurance broker out there, because that’s a really low bar.

SPEAKER F

Right.

ALYSHA SMITH

But to be the best service provider.

KEVIN JESSOP

For every client that we have. Okay, we want to be, you know.

ALYSHA SMITH

That trusted partner, just as they’re, you know, big four accounting firm is or their attorneys or any of those guys.

SPEAKER E

Okay.

KEVIN JESSOP

That’s where we like to think of ourselves, though. We’re not always, you know.

PETER STEVENSON

Okay, so then what’s the advice for someone?

ALYSHA SMITH

The advice for somebody there, for somebody that’s in that insurance provider space is really get in, get your hands dirty. Network as much as you can.

SPEAKER D

Okay.

ALYSHA SMITH

When I say network as much as.

KEVIN JESSOP

You can, I mean, like, not only.

ALYSHA SMITH

Are there great opportunities within the service provider community.

SPEAKER E

Yeah.

ALYSHA SMITH

There’s tons of good companies out there.

KEVIN JESSOP

That, you know, you could jump to.

ALYSHA SMITH

And when you’re in a marketing position or you’re working as with a service provider, you have so many clients and you’re exposed to so many different companies, you know who the good ones are.

SPEAKER F

Right.

KEVIN JESSOP

I mean, you really get, you know.

ALYSHA SMITH

A good feel for where, where the.

KEVIN JESSOP

Next jump might be.

PETER STEVENSON

There’s been, I’ve, I mean, I’ve been working selling branding services for, you know, six years now and I’ve almost, I’ve wanted to jump to so many of them because, oh, yeah, you just follow great with companies, right. They’re just, they’re unbelievable. And yeah, it’s fun to see the inside of a company.

SPEAKER E

Yeah.

KEVIN JESSOP

I love it.

PETER STEVENSON

Okay, so last question. Give us some. Where are some places that people should go eat in the, in the greater Utah area?

ALYSHA SMITH

Oh, goodness.

PETER STEVENSON

If you, if you were going to take, you’re going to go on a date night where you’re going, where’s date night level? Great.

KEVIN JESSOP

Well, see, it all depends on what you’re after, I guess.

ALYSHA SMITH

I’m, I mean, I must admit date.

KEVIN JESSOP

Night for me is often, you know.

ALYSHA SMITH

Something that’s comfortable, that’s casual, that is good. I like a lot of the savory restaurants.

SPEAKER D

Okay.

PETER STEVENSON

The other savory groups.

SPEAKER E

Yeah.

SPEAKER D

Okay.

KEVIN JESSOP

I like via 313. I like r and R barbecue.

ALYSHA SMITH

A lot of those fast casual places.

KEVIN JESSOP

On the higher end.

ALYSHA SMITH

I mean, there’s still no place like Sundance. You know, the grill room.

PETER STEVENSON

Oh my God.

SPEAKER E

Yeah.

PETER STEVENSON

Oh, yeah. It’s, I am super excited about the tree rooms. New menu up there.

ALYSHA SMITH

And Park City is just so full of so many good options.

SPEAKER E

Yeah.

ALYSHA SMITH

And then Salt Lake as well.

SPEAKER F

Right?

PETER STEVENSON

When you’re downtown, you go to lunch with some people. Downtown. Where are you going?

ALYSHA SMITH

Oh, goodness. See, downtown, you know, we’re creatures of habit.

KEVIN JESSOP

We’ve got great options.

ALYSHA SMITH

We work right across the street from City Creek and so, you know, Bokata.

KEVIN JESSOP

Red iguana right, right there.

ALYSHA SMITH

Just so good to go to, you know, even if it’s almost every day.

PETER STEVENSON

I, I have to say I’m a little sad that you didn’t mention the best fries in Salt Lake City right next to your offices at Harmon’s.

ALYSHA SMITH

Oh my gosh, they are so good.

PETER STEVENSON

They’re the best fries I know in the state.

ALYSHA SMITH

They’re fried in that wonderful beef tallow.

PETER STEVENSON

I know.

ALYSHA SMITH

And the hamburgers, you would never expect.

KEVIN JESSOP

Burgers that good out of a grocery store.

PETER STEVENSON

They’re so good. It’s my. It’s my number one most underrated place to go. Yeah.

KEVIN JESSOP

My brother in law not too long.

ALYSHA SMITH

Ago said, hey, I’ve got an opportunity.

KEVIN JESSOP

To take a bunch of young men on a very quick hamburger run in.

ALYSHA SMITH

Salt Lake City before I drop them.

KEVIN JESSOP

Off at the airport. And that was one of the places I gave him. It’s like b and D burger.

ALYSHA SMITH

There’s hires. But really, if you want a really good burger and you’re not too keyed.

KEVIN JESSOP

In on ambiance, oh, my gosh, that.

ALYSHA SMITH

Harman’s burger is so good.

KEVIN JESSOP

And the fries are amazing.

PETER STEVENSON

I would be lying if I said that I don’t go there regularly and just order the fries at like 03:00 on a Tuesday when I need a better emotional state.

KEVIN JESSOP

Thank you. So good.

PETER STEVENSON

They’re the best. Thank you so much, Kevin. I’ll see you at the Mountain west capital network stuff, and thanks for all you do for this great state.

KEVIN JESSOP

Absolutely. Thanks a ton.

SPEAKER D

Peter.

PETER STEVENSON

Thank you for joining us today on this episode of Buy Subject podcast. If you have any guest recommendations or other comments, you can send them to us@infouysubjectpodcast.com. Dot by Subject Podcast is a production of modern eight and agency in partnership with Silicon Slopes, the Mount West Capital Network. Audio production by Dave Meakum, video production by Connor Mitchell and the music by the insanely talented Josh Johnston. If you need any place to eat or if you need any of our old interviews, you can find that all on our website@buysubjectpodcast.com. Dot.

*Pardon our transcriptions, They’re transcribed using ai.

By Subject is a production of modern8 with support from Silicon Slopes + MountainWest Capital Network.